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Plasticine Strategy

A plasticine strategy requires a culture that is underpinned by strong ethics and high performance. We all know what happens to a house built on weak foundations, it doesn’t stand the test of time and an organisation is no different.

Most organisations around the globe whether large, small, public, private, government, not-for-profit, sporting or recreational are faced with the challenge of how to remain relevant in an ever demanding world.

Strategies that assume a relatively fixed course over a set period of time fail to recognise that everything is in a state of flux and constant change. This has always been the case and as far as we know will always be the case. It is only the degree of change that differs.

Nevertheless, many are struggling to form a clear view of the future and are asking the question “how do we set a course for a future that we don’t understand?” Besides consulting a clairvoyant (check failed stockbroking firm BBY) or even those rare breed of people called futurists, there is a way to approach this dilemma.

Plasticine strategy is all about being highly adaptable in a way that allows you to not only survive but thrive in a demanding, rapidly changing world. Assuming the foundation is in place the next step is being absolutely clear on what you do and why that is valued by others. From there you need to be able to continue to evolve what you do in a way that justifies the organisations on-going existence.

Here are the keys to implementing an effective plasticine strategy:

  • Great leadership;
  • High level business acumen;
  • Relevant real-time data; and
  • Quality, timely decision making.

Don’t forget that an effective strategy is delivered from a foundation of strong ethics and high performing people (check out how Netflix did this). Making strategy part of “business as usual” is also critical – that will foster open-mindedness, innovation, collaboration and resilience.

So much opportunity, so little time!


Winston Churchill

Change is hard

Winston Churchill said “to improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often”.

If we are not committed to continually improving ourselves, or if you like developing our characters, how do we expect to make the most of our time on the planet?

For the majority change is hard, we are creatures of habit whether those habits are good, bad or indifferent. Typically change will come from three places:


  • I want to change (internal – desire);
  • I need to change (internal – desperation); or
  • I have to change (external – law, regulation).

Change for the sake of change is foolish so it is vital to have a clear view on the objective and inherent value before embarking on a process of change whether personally or in business.

On one hand I find change to be exciting and on the other scary – working through the fear is my biggest challenge!  However, if we risk nothing and do nothing we limit our experiences, our growth and our capacity to be of use to others.

If you struggle with change or just don’t know how to go about it, look for someone who can help and live your life with no regrets!